Published on 12/20/2017 by Brady

Are you constantly mishitting the ball off the center of the racket? Fixing this common problem can be fixed by retraining how you watch the ball. Find out how in today’s daily lesson.

20 comments

  • Paul Austin 1 week ago

    Thanks for the video. Great. I’d like to be added to your email and videos. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 6 days ago

      Thanks Paul! If you sign up for any of my free courses you’re automatically added.

  • Basem 3 weeks ago

    Thank you for clear and easy lesson to watch the ball .
    Basem AL Fares
    JORDAN

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 3 weeks ago

      Thanks for the encouragement Basem!

  • Giuseppe 1 month ago

    Hi Brady ,thanks for that clip really really. cool.
    Have a great festivity you and Mark.
    Giuseppe

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 4 weeks ago

      Always appreciate it Giuseppe. Happy Holidays!

  • RooHa 1 month ago

    Top tip
    Succinct and to the point
    Thanks
    Merry Christmas

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 4 weeks ago

      Thanks–Merry Christmas to you and yours!

  • Bill Callahan 1 month ago

    Thanks Brady I never saw this drill before it really helped me a lot. Merry Christmas ad Wonderful New Year!

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Happy to hear that it helped you Bill–Merry Christmas to you!

  • Seelan 1 month ago

    Thanks for the video it was a eye opener to everybody that is playing tennis young or old the fundamental approach is keep your eye on the ball every time you practice or play a match it will improve your game looking forward for your next video

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Thanks for watching/commenting Seelan!

  • Dewey Hill 1 month ago

    Good stuff. I’m going to try it. Love the concept.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Thanks Dewey. Simple drill, kinda fun and it really works.

  • Joel Ulan 1 month ago

    Somewhat akin to batters “seeing” the seams on a pitch. Wonderful advice. Thanks, again.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Thanks Joel! Training your eyes and brain to watch the ball correctly is a skill just like anything else in the game.

  • George Oberlander 1 month ago

    I’ll take your word for this exercise actually improving your ball contact accuracy, Brady, but I wonder if “seeing the ball” is too vague a concept. What I mean is that information gained by watching the ball is not of equal value throughout the ball’s flight. Getting a good look at the ball as it’s being hit by the opponent is obviously very important because it tells us what direction the ball is going. Also important is our peripheral vision, which will help us take an educated guess at the velocity the ball will be coming back with.

    The flight of the ball after it leaves the opponent’s racquet until it crosses the net seems to me to have lesser value because its spin will modify its path and velocity after it lands in the court. So, getting the best snapshot view of the ball right after it bounces on my side of the court would be critical in getting an accurate estimation of its (now changed) velocity, height after bouncing, and any path deviation caused by factors like the court surface.

    There might be a danger in trying to focus so intently on the ball that you can see its seams or read its label in that one’s peripheral vision is reduced and, trying to concentrate on the ball equally throughout each part of its flight will lead to early mental fatigue. Its hard to maintain the same level of concentration throughout an entire match.

    So I wonder whether it wouldn’t be better to bring our concentration to a peak at the moment of the opponent’s ball strike and again just after the ball lands on my side of the court. I don’t see why your method of concentration can’t be applied just at these two times.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      This drill and video addresses more for after the bounce of the ball on your side of the court. Also you can still watch the ball intently and have good peripheral vision…these aren’t mutually exclusive things. If you train your eyes and brain correctly it’s not an exhausting routine, simply rather the norm. Obviously as the ball nears, your field of vision will narrow and you must focus more intently on the ball which is what most recreational players can do a much better job of.

  • christopher constable 1 month ago

    Great video.Iis there anyway you could do this drill by yourself at home?

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      I’m sure you could come up with a way but I’ve only done it with a student. Closing your eyes and tossing the balls against a wall may do the trick.

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