Published on 10/30/2017 by Brady

What exactly is pronation when it pertains to your tennis game? Brady breaks it down in the most simplest of terms in today’s lesson.

15 comments

  • Richard 1 month ago

    Or, does a complete pronation twist leave no room for the wrist to turn further?

    I recall the great Vic Braden’s demonstration. He had a real cast put on one of his instructors to show that he could serve at a high level without a wrist snap.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      I would love to see that Vic Braden demo. Also here’s a simple diagram for the wrist and arm movements specific to the serve. I generally don’t like to use mumbo jumbo terms but “wrist snap” is just too broad and can be open to interpretation.

      http://www.ergovancouver.net/wrist_movements.htm

  • Richard 1 month ago

    So, NO separate wrist movement?

    Thanks. You’re instruction is always clear and excellent.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      There’s definitely separate wrist movement but for this video (and week) I’m just focusing on pronation. Wrist movement needed on the serve (extension & flexion) generally comes more naturally for players but not so much for pronation which often needs to be learned. Good question Richard!

  • Bob Benson 1 month ago

    It’s really not much more than a wrist snap at the point of contact – Correct?

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Actually if you noticed in the video I never mentioned wrist, as this is an independent movement from you wrist. Obviously due to pronation the position of the hand changes significant but this is not driven from your wrist. While I’ve used the term wrist snap in the past I try and stay away from it now.

    • Dai Kayll 1 month ago

      Also the weight of the raquet that you wield has an effect on the involvement of your wrist. The heavier the raquet, the more plough through, hence a more pronounced wrist break on contact. This is why the pros look as if they break their wrists. Their raquets arw probably much heavier than yours at the club.

  • Fio Marin 1 month ago

    WHY not just call PRONATION – TURNING OF THE PLAYING ARM.

    Like do we want these pupils to learn and improve their racwuet action at contact or do we just want to try to sound biomechanically competent in our role as coaches?

    Reply
    • Marc 1 month ago

      Because pronation is the correct term, that’s why! “Turning of the playing arm” does not describe which way to turn the arm, whereas pronation is a very specific directional description. I hope this answers your question. It should.

    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Marc is right. While I’m all for keeping this simple “turning of the playing arm” is not specific enough as the arm can turn in many different ways. Pronation is the specific movement.

    • Dai Kayll 1 month ago

      Plus, you can’t make pronation happen ! It just does, as a natural consequence of a specific arm action, i.e. the tennis serve.

  • jack giegerich 1 month ago

    great instruction

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Thanks for watching Jack!

  • B 1 month ago

    Awesome

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 1 month ago

      Much appreciated!

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