Published on 05/30/2017 by Brady

Where should your eyes be at contact on a groundstroke? The answer may surprise you. In today’s lesson, Brady tackles this topic dealing with where your focus should be at point of contact.

21 comments

  • Chudamani Pokhrel 1 month ago

    excellent teaching and very helpfull indeed..excited to do this on the court soon

    Reply
  • Dai Kayll 2 months ago

    I struggle with this discipline in matchplay. In practice I can make it a goal but in matchplay I’m so intent on seeing if my opponent is in trouble or not the ole noggin’ comes up for a looksee ! Very frustrating as I’ve proved time and time again that when I play a stroke with my head still and not looking up before the contact, my stroke is a much better one and a much deeper one too !.How, How, HOW can I get this simple but necessary tick out of my game and ,as your super video says, keep the eye and head still on contact. Brady, Any tips please?

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Just like anything else it takes a ton of dedicated practice. Not just one hitting session or a few reminders. You have to hit THOUSANDS of balls to likely makes this a permanent habit. No better time to start than today!

  • William 2 months ago

    A key benefit in looking at the ball as long as possible is that it slows it down and gives the brain more time to hit a perfect shot. It’s basic physics. Watched particles slow.
    The brain has to know the contact point. it gets that info through the eyes.
    I think that one reason Federer is so good is he has eye-contact with the ball longer than pretty well any other player.
    Of course, it’s not natural for humans to be swinging forward while keeping our heads back, so to speak. We just have to work on it.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Great comment William! Too many players definitely lift their head too early as well.

  • Sebastien 2 months ago

    Hi Brady,
    I was just working on that for the past 2 weeks. I started by thinking that when I serve I hit the ball depending on how I want it. Flat : in the middle / Slice : on the side / Kick : under.
    So I tried to do the same on my groundstrokes. Worked great at pratice! I was just concentrated on looking carefully at the ball and how I was going to hit it but when it came to a match it did not work so well. I think it took to much concentration, my strokes where great but I “forgot” all the rest, mainly the tactic side.
    Still, do you think it would be a good thing to try and hit the ball so precisely or not?

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      In general, you should not be focusing on how to execute in a match…rather you should be focusing on simply executing. Tactics, keeping your energy up, staying positive are more beneficial areas to focus you energy in a match. Practice and matchplay are two completely different animals.

  • Peter 2 months ago

    Like all your previous videos, this is also helpful for playing better tennis. Thank you, keep on doing please producing such great videos.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Thanks Peter! More videos to come for sure.

  • Jose 2 months ago

    The reason why Federer seems to be looking at the contact point is NOT so much to do about looking at the ball (although of course he does). Federer accelerates his shoulders and hips first followed by his arm and finally the head of the racquet whips to meet at the contact point. It seems like he is focusing on the ball (he is) but what he is doing is stopping the shoulders parallel with the baseline in order to generate whip action as his arm and racquet head catches up. In addition, his arm is nearly straight and the added distance from his body to the tip of the racquet helps in generating incredible racquet head speed.

    Reply
    • Bill Danks 2 months ago

      Instinctively, from the time that when we humans would look up to see a lion, the hands move up as we look up. Not moving the head keeps the arms from moving in a defensive move to defend against the lion. It also helps to keep an eye on the ball to see where to hit but the other main factor is to avoid this instinctive reaction.

    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Federer is definitely the best in the business at creating significant lag with his swing. Thanks guys, great discussion as usual.

  • William 2 months ago

    Excellent presentation; concise with great demonstration.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Much appreciated William!

  • Anil kumar 2 months ago

    Very good observation and practical. Copying a top ATP player blindly is not practical!

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Thanks Anil!

  • Philip Monzon 2 months ago

    Good review of keeping your eyes on the ball. Very helpful.

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Much appreciated Philip!

  • dan deighan 2 months ago

    like!!!! you are in a class by yourself.

    Reply
  • ALLEN WILLIAMS 2 months ago

    Very helpful indeed !!!

    Reply
    • Brady
      Brady 2 months ago

      Thanks Allen–good luck on the court!

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